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Thursday, 31 August 2017

366 – A Scriptovisual Composition Unknown: An Artistic Investigation of the Spaces between Spaces in the Quest to Create a post-European Era, post-Enlightenment Science

366 – A Scriptovisual Composition Unknown is the result of several artistic processes. Founded in the artistic way of working called, not knowing, and the surrealist technique of writing described by André Breton in the First Manifesto of Surrealism, the work is simultaneously located in both the expressive and the cognitive. But the work is more than just a book, for it is also the product of working simultaneously in two forms of expression – descriptive and plastic. Thus the work is the product of a dual creative process, being scriptovisual in form: a painting and a book which together form the work with the title: 366 – A Scriptovisual Composition Unknown.

And the reason for the above, it transpired, was to undertake an artistic investigation of the spaces between spaces as part of the author’s life-long quest to create a post-European era, post-Enlightenment science and technology. Now is the time to bring this search to fruition, for it is surely the case that a move beyond a science and technology – a culture – that is based on conquest and domination is much needed. Many people in the modern world are weighed down with baggage from the past that comes in the form of functionalism, determinism, positivism, mechanism, scientism, technocracy, materialism, historicism, … The list is quite long! It is a baggage that is destroying humanity and the planet!

The supremacy of the fragmented, reductive, and overly rational mind, heroised in the European world, is leading humanity to the edge of doom, to the creation of a dysfunctional – dystopian – world in which no sane person would want to live. Yet the very nature of the problem – the fragmented, reductive, and overly rational mind – which craves the one best way of knowing, the sole truth, and unambiguousness, even though the complexity of human existence point towards there been many ways of knowing, many truths, and a state of ambiguity as the norm, is preventing the step forward that humanity must now take. Mix the fragmented, reductive, and overly rational mind, with mind-sets that value and prioritise data, numbers, mathematics, and computations, above other ways of knowing, as well as softer thinking based on intuitions, feelings, etc., then one has a recipe for a disaster on a scale never before been seen in human history.

Provided in this work therefore, are the reasons, presented in a way that is highly unusual, why the development of a different type of science and technology is now needed. The reader will also discover pointers towards the creation of this new form of science and technology, the development of which, the reader will learn, is far more advanced than people realise. Raised also as a consequence is an issue called Unity of Knowledge, for which so-called consilience, the author has concluded, is an irrelevance. The author proposes that what is required is the development of a new Theory of Knowledge; one that is built on a different perception of the universe and humanity to that which dominates in the European world.

The book is also a demonstration of the value of artistic thinking and practices, which contrasts sharply with the obsession that some in the world of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) have, which in many cases is nothing more than an appropriation of the arts for the furthering of an old vision of STEM, which is – to borrow from Ancient Greek mythology and the story of Prometheus – just entrails (more of that baggage referred to above), dressed up with a little good meat (art).





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